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Electric Owners: $1000 Challenge to Prove Your Temperature

Would you like a chance to win a $1000 cash prize?  Cryosauna Reviews is sponsoring a cold-challenge!  Simply film yourself testing your electric-chamber’s temperature reaching below -120°F, share a link with us, and you could win one grand in cash!  Here’s the catch: we know that you will not be able to. We have been trying for the past two years to find an electric chamber that gets colder than that.  It is merely out of our concern that we are finally publicizing the problem: electric cryotherapy chamber temperatures are being falsely advertised.

We Tested 8 Electric Chambers

To test the most popular electric chambers in the marketplace we followed a simple procedure: we scheduled appointments and measured the temperatures with two digital thermometers.  We used a Reed C-370 RTD Thermometer and an Omega Precision RTD during the sessions.¹  Each thermometer was held in a gloved hand and kept steady at 8 inches away from the chest.  We required the testers to wear a facemask for protection and to prevent breathing on the temperature probes.  While it was comforting to watch both thermometers perform quickly with highly accurate results the final temperatures were alarming.  This included the electric chambers owned by friends and colleagues.

Our Reviews Are Not Sponsored

Cryosauna Reviews does not make or sell any cryo chambers.  We have independently reported on every cryotherapy chamber on the market, from nitrogen to electrics and now hybrid machines.  What our reporting and study over the past 24 months has found is startling: no electric chamber can reach lower than -120°F degrees in the central area of the chamber.  This is where the client would stand and receive the benefit of the cold air.  Most machines we have tested placed their temperature monitor (thermocouple, thermometer, etc.) so close to the cooling element that it produces a manipulated reading.  The temperature where the person stands is not -160°F or even -150°F.  Some machines did not even reach -100°F, yet the large digital display of the chamber read temperatures much colder.

Did You Buy A Fancy Freezer?

Cryo chamber manufacturers have become adamant on advertising the lowest possible temperatures as part of their marketing.  Consumers have become attracted to the “colder is better” mentality, and ultimately it is the business owner who pays the price.  The cryogenic environment begins at -160°F.  Temperatures that are not that low are by definition not cryogenic.  Unfortunately if you purchased an electric cryotherapy chamber you may have just bought yourself a fancy freezer.  Will it produce results?  Yes.  But did you pay too much?  Probably.

What Electric Cryo Owners Can Do

If you cannot prove that you electric chamber actually performs as advertised there is not a whole lot you can do.  We called 8 manufacturers and asked about their temperature claims and weather or not the client’s position would receive the same temperature air as the installed thermocouple.  None of their responses were satisfactory and it became clear that without industry regulations there is little a consumer can do when a manufacturer misrepresents their product.

As an alternative you can focus on how much a client’s skin temperature drops rather than the interior temperature of the machine.  In our polling it appears that clients are interested in seeing how their body responded to cryo.  If you are able to switch off (or cover) the temperature display it may actually help your business to do so.  Clients will instead focus on their own skin temperatures instead of the digital displays that are misleading.

Footnotes

  1. We initially only used the Reed thermometer and became concerned that it was defective when it would not reach the lower advertised temperatures.  We then purchased the Omega thermometer and tested them side-by-side only to learn that both worked accurately.  It was the chamber that was not accurate.  This launched the beginning of our investigation which lasted over two years.