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Electric Owners: $1000 Challenge to Prove Your Temperature

Would you like a chance to win a $1000 cash prize?  Cryosauna Reviews is sponsoring a cold-challenge!  Simply film yourself testing your electric-chamber’s temperature reaching below -120°F, share a link with us, and you could win one grand in cash!  Here’s the catch: we know that you will not be able to. We have been trying for the past two years to find an electric chamber that gets colder than that.  It is merely out of our concern that we are finally publicizing the problem: electric cryotherapy chamber temperatures are being falsely advertised.

We Tested 8 Electric Chambers

To test the most popular electric chambers in the marketplace we followed a simple procedure: we scheduled appointments and measured the temperatures with two digital thermometers.  We used a Reed C-370 RTD Thermometer and an Omega Precision RTD during the sessions.¹  Each thermometer was held in a gloved hand and kept steady at 8 inches away from the chest.  We required the testers to wear a facemask for protection and to prevent breathing on the temperature probes.  While it was comforting to watch both thermometers perform quickly with highly accurate results the final temperatures were alarming.  This included the electric chambers owned by friends and colleagues.

Our Reviews Are Not Sponsored

Cryosauna Reviews does not make or sell any cryo chambers.  We have independently reported on every cryotherapy chamber on the market, from nitrogen to electrics and now hybrid machines.  What our reporting and study over the past 24 months has found is startling: no electric chamber can reach lower than -120°F degrees in the central area of the chamber.  This is where the client would stand and receive the benefit of the cold air.  Most machines we have tested placed their temperature monitor (thermocouple, thermometer, etc.) so close to the cooling element that it produces a manipulated reading.  The temperature where the person stands is not -160°F or even -150°F.  Some machines did not even reach -100°F, yet the large digital display of the chamber read temperatures much colder.

Did You Buy A Fancy Freezer?

Cryo chamber manufacturers have become adamant on advertising the lowest possible temperatures as part of their marketing.  Consumers have become attracted to the “colder is better” mentality, and ultimately it is the business owner who pays the price.  The cryogenic environment begins at -160°F.  Temperatures that are not that low are by definition not cryogenic.  Unfortunately if you purchased an electric cryotherapy chamber you may have just bought yourself a fancy freezer.  Will it produce results?  Yes.  But did you pay too much?  Probably.

What Electric Cryo Owners Can Do

If you cannot prove that you electric chamber actually performs as advertised there is not a whole lot you can do.  We called 8 manufacturers and asked about their temperature claims and weather or not the client’s position would receive the same temperature air as the installed thermocouple.  None of their responses were satisfactory and it became clear that without industry regulations there is little a consumer can do when a manufacturer misrepresents their product.

As an alternative you can focus on how much a client’s skin temperature drops rather than the interior temperature of the machine.  In our polling it appears that clients are interested in seeing how their body responded to cryo.  If you are able to switch off (or cover) the temperature display it may actually help your business to do so.  Clients will instead focus on their own skin temperatures instead of the digital displays that are misleading.

Footnotes

  1. We initially only used the Reed thermometer and became concerned that it was defective when it would not reach the lower advertised temperatures.  We then purchased the Omega thermometer and tested them side-by-side only to learn that both worked accurately.  It was the chamber that was not accurate.  This launched the beginning of our investigation which lasted over two years.
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What Cryotherapy Chamber Is Best After COVID-19?

With wellness centers and gyms reopening many business owners are asking What cryotherapy chamber is best after COVID-19? With the entire landscape of health and wellness changed from the global pandemic many industry leaders are warning that all equipment must satisfy the post-pandemic customer. What does this mean for current cryotherapy chamber owners after COVID-19 and how can new businesses satisfy what the customer wants?

Four people standing in a cryotherapy chamber after COVID-19
Cryotherapy after COVID-19 will not be a group activity anymore, even with masks, according to a poll of 3500 CR readers.

The Best Cryotherapy Chamber After COVID Is…

Without endorsing any specific brand the best cryotherapy chamber after COVID is the one that makes the client feel safe. By and large most people will not want to participate in cryotherapy in pairs or groups. This has become a problem for electric based chambers such as the US Cryotherapy and Cryo Arctic.¹ Consumers want a personal experience where they are not exposed to another person’s germs. Chambers must now have an anti-porous interior. Some chambers I reviewed have antibacterial materials (such as the XR by Cryo Innovations). Others, such as the Juka have padded cloth interiors that do not allow wipe-downs effectively, and actually absorb liquids.

Is Head-out Cryotherapy The Best Now?

There has long been a healthy debate about whether or not cryo is best with the head exposed or not. While clinical studies are conclusive that it doesn’t not matter the debate continues due to marketing pressure. But cryotherapy and COVID have changed a lot. A Cryosauna Reviews poll of 3500 households (with 2965 people responding) the head-out cryosauna option is a clear winner. The reasons stated by respondents were telling: clients simply did not want to be in a chamber that could contain someone else’s breath even if everyone was wearing masks. The psychological effect of having one’s head out of the chamber was enough to make clients feel safer.

Is This The End Of Enclosed Chambers?

Enclosed cryotherapy chambers are here to stay, but with pandemic concerns now a regular conversation it may not be the time to invest in one. Clients are highly concerned about their immune systems and seek out cryo for its potential immune system benefits. Enclosed chamber owners should immediately address how they will sanitize the chamber and provide air-out times. For clients who do cryotherapy regularly it appears a definite shift is happening to choose cryosaunas instead of enclosed chambers.

  1. http://Louis, J., Schaal, K., Bieuzen, F., Le Meur, Y., Filliard, J. R., Volondat, M., Hausswirth, C. (2015). Head Exposure to Cold during Whole-Body Cryostimulation: Influence on Thermal Response and Autonomic Modulation. PloS one, 10(4), e0124776. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0124776
  2. Both the US Cryotherapy C1 and Cryo Artic are single person chambers by design; however, in practice this author has seen operators allow two people in these chamber at the same time.
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Nitrogen-Based Vs Electric Cryo Chambers: Which Ones Are Better?

Cryotherapy is gaining popularity and the industry projections have it growing by more than $176 million in 2025.

Whether you are thinking of starting a cryotherapy center or need a cryo chamber for individual uses, there are 2 main options for you to choose from nitrogen-based cryo chambers and electric cryo chambers.  Which type of cryo-chamber should you buy? Here’s a quick overview of both types.

Differences Between Nitrogen and Electric Cryo Machines

The main difference between the 2 types of machines is in the cooling process. Nitrogen-based cryo chambers turn liquid nitrogen into cold gas which is then pumped into the chamber while electric cryo chambers use electricity to compress air and decrease its temperature.

1. Recommended areas of use

Nitrogen-based cryo machines would be perfect for entrepreneurs whose start-up costs are limited. They are ideal for small businesses, start-ups or for those looking to integrate cryotherapy into an existing business since they are cheaper than electric cryo chambers.

Electric cryo machines are a bit expensive and would be ideal for businesses with an established clientele and high frequency of booked cryo sessions.  Hospitals or wellness centers would benefit from this machine.

2. Efficiency

A nitrogen cryo machine takes about 3 minutes to cool down and get ready for a session. Most electric chambers take an average of 2-3 hours.  The high amount of time it takes for the electric cryo-chamber to get ready makes it uneconomical for small businesses with few daily sessions.

After a session, a nitrogen chamber cools down in less than a minute but you will have to wait longer for the electric chamber to resume normal temperatures. On the other hand, you may spend more on liquid nitrogen than you might spend on electric bills.

3. Type of therapy

Nitrogen chambers are used for partial cryotherapy while electric chambers offer full-body cryotherapy. On average, nitrogen chambers use about 7 liters while an electric machine can use up to 250kwh.

4. Other features

  • Mobility – Nitrogen chambers are mobile. They often come on wheels, making them ideal for anyone looking to offer mobile cryotherapy.  Electric chambers are fixed and are ideal for brick and mortar businesses.
  • Yearly maintenance – Electric chambers need yearly maintenance while nitrogen chambers don’t.
  • Repairs – Nitrogen chambers are fairly easy to fix when they break down but electric chambers require onsite technical assistance. This can result in higher down times especially if you have to wait for parts to be imported.
  • Size – Nitrogen chambers are considerably smaller than electric chambers. If space is a concern, start with nitrogen.

Nitrogen-Based Vs Electric Cryochambers: Which One Should You Buy?

Despite both cryo machines having distinct differences, it all boils down to your project requirements. Which chamber do you feel would suit your unique business or individual needs? 

Before making a purchase, analyze each cryo-chamber deeply to ensure that it is within your budget, it is safe, secure, and easy to use and that its maintenance won’t result in high downtimes.

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Best Cryotherapy Machines of 2019

The best cryotherapy machines of 2019 is a tough call. I have done a cryo session everyday for over two years now. I have only missed my cryo on days when I was traveling. In total I think I have enjoyed a crotherapy session about 4 days per week for the entire year. How did I afford all of this? Ironically most companies offered me cryotherapy for free for a “positive review.” I always tell them that I will write a positive review only if my experience is positive, and it often is. But you may notice that I have never officially endorsed a cryotherapy machine for a reason: I want to remain as impartial as possible.

The Best of the Best Cryotherapy Machines of 2019

For the most part what makes a top performing cryotherapy machine? In my humble opinion it meets three criteria:

  • The session is not interrupted by a system failure
  • The temperature reaches below -200°F
  • I feel safe

Those are three easy goals for becoming one of the best cryotherapy machines of 2019. Nonetheless many machines and cryotherapy providers just cannot meet all three. Sometimes my session is started only to suddenly stop and I have to get out, wait, and start again. This wastes my time and gives me concerns that I am not safe. I also want the temperature to reach colder than -200°F. This often means I am drawn to use liquid nitrogen machines because electric cryotherapy machines cannot reach below -160°F. For the record I am not opposed to electric machines, I just feel they do not provide as effective therapy because electric cryotherapy machines cannot reach below -160°F.

The XR by Cryo Innovations

Best Cryotherapy Machines of 2019. 
The XR cryosauna by Cryo Innovations with door open and woman standing inside.  Cryotherapy machine.  Liquid nitrogen based cryotherapy machine.
The XR is a pro-athlete favorite

First place for 2019 is the Tesla-looking XR by Cryo Innovations. This cryotherapy machine immediately looks impressive. Solid and sturdy with illuminated blue lights this cryotherapy machine is hands-down different from anything else. Comfortable inside I always felt VERY safe as it has 8 safety features running at the same time. It even has an earclip that measures my pulse and blood oxygen levels which was actually fun to watch. I also quickly realized that the machine was ready to go almost instantly. The “pre-cool” time was faster than I could get undressed, and before I knew it the temperature was -230°F.

The Impact by Impact Cryotherapy

Best Cryotherapy Machines of 2019. 
The Impact Cryosauna in black color with door closed.
An Oldie But Goodie

The Impact Cryosauna is popular for being such an old model. Made in the USA like the XR gives the Impact a feeling of reliability. Many foreign made cryosaunas concern me. If a part breaks it may take awhile to have it replaced. The Impact made my “best of” list simply because it is a popular machine and I see it all across the country. Like the XR it gets cold, often below -210°F. I am comfortable in it as a consumer; however, if I were to buy one I would have the following requests for the manufacturer:

  • Make the walls sturdier. They are thin walls and it seems that they could be thicker for longevity.
  • The head-hole makes me feel trapped. It somewhat feels like a cigar-cutter and that my head and neck stick out like I am in a guillotine. The lid-with-a-hole feels weird, so why have it? It also forces the nitrogen gas towards my face, making me constantly worried I am inhaling it.

Onward to 2020!

This year is bringing huge advances to the cryotherapy world. New technology will enhance safety and bring cryotherapy to nearly every city in the country. Look for:

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Is “breathable air” better?

Breathable air cryotherapy machine with door open in blue, black, and white colors.

Is breathable air better for cyrotherapy? The controversy surrounds the difference between electric and nitrogen based cryotherapy machines. Liquid nitrogen machines chill the air with a cold gas. In contrast, electric machines chill the air in the same manner as a freezer or air conditioner. If you have ever been in either machine you know that breathing becomes noticeable as soon as the cold hits your skin.

What is “breathable” air?

Electric cryotherapy chamber designers use the phrase “breathable air” in their marketing. Sometimes people are afraid that they may inhale liquid nitrogen gas (or “gasiform nitrogen”) in an open-top cryotherapy chamber. But this rarely happens because the person’s head is far above the cold clouds of gas. Nitrogen chamber designers also point out the fact that the air we breathe is 78% nitrogen. Breathing pure nitrogen is not healthy; however, a small whiff of a cloud–such as at Creamistry–will not cause any problems.

Breathable air is harder than you…think?

You are breathing right now, and you have been since the day you were born. But breathing during cryotherapy becomes noticeable as the temperature begins to drop. In the current marketplace you have two options: a chamber powered by electricity alone or by liquid nitrogen alone. Electric cryotherapy chambers are walk-in type of chambers that chill your entire body from head to toe. When I first tried one I was excited as I thought it was a superior method. But I quickly noticed that my breathing was noticeable and that it was VERY COLD air. I did not panic, but the air felt thick and I had to mentally calm myself down.

What is the big difference anyway?

My cryotherapy journey began when my gym bought a nitrogen-based chamber a few years ago. My workout days are the same and I still use that machine every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. I make my recovery a priority, but my evaluation of different chambers requires an open mind. I like trying EVERY cryotherapy method I find, and they are all pretty good. Whether the air is “breathable” doesn’t matter to me since I am not (and never have) had a problem in an open-top nitrogen machine. What I have noticed is these two major points:

  • Electric machines “feel” colder. When my head felt the cold it made my entire body feel cold. But overall the temp was not as low as what I am used to.
  • Nitrogen machines get the coldest of all but are more comfortable since my face and scalp do not feel cold.

These points seem a bit contradictory: one feels colder but is not as cold as the other. From my clinical understanding the head-in chamber feels colder because my head has all five senses getting cold at the same time. Head-out chambers keep my head warm while chilling me from the neck down so they don’t feel as cold.

Price Points

Blogging in this small field puts me out there. I am approached nearly once a week. Companies want advertising space on this site which we never sell. We don’t do that, so I won’t recommend either type of chamber over another. Instead I will leave you with these facts gleaned from the industry:

  • Nitrogen based machines cost anywhere from 45k to 65k. Most are made in Europe but two are made in the USA.
  • Electric machines cost anywhere of 80k to 150k.
  • Nitrogen machines are roll-in and go. They can operate as soon as they arrive. They do require a vent in small rooms.
  • Electric machines require professional installation and 220 volt power, along with some plumbing.
  • Hybrid machines that use liquid nitrogen gas to make a “breatheable air” environment are not as cold as a pure nitrogen chamber.